Enjoy the Climb with Jenn Drummond

February 20, 2024
James Whittaker

Check out this episode on the Win the Day Podcast

You’re off to great places. Today is your day! Your mountain is waiting, so get on your way!”

– Dr. Seuss

Jenn Drummond achieved business success as the founder and CEO of a thriving financial services company. After moving to Park City, Utah, to enjoy the outdoors with her seven kids, life was traveling a little too smoothly until a fateful moment changed her life forever.

It was a snowy evening in 2018 when a horrific car accident brought Jenn just inches away from death. The authorities and experts couldn’t figure out how she had managed to survive against such impossible odds. But for Jenn, it was an important realization that while we cannot control when we leave this life, we can choose how we live it.

Since then, Jenn has become the first woman to climb the World's Seven Second Summits – the second tallest mountains on every continent. That includes K2, the second-highest mountain on Earth, widely considered the toughest and most dangerous mountain to climb.

When she’s not climbing mountains, Jenn travels the world as a professional speaker where she shares her journey of setbacks and triumphs. She’s also the author of new book, BreakProof: 7 Strategies to Build Resilience and Achieve Your Life Goals.

In this episode:

  • The fateful night that changed Jenn’s life forever
  • How to stay positive when it feels like everything is against you
  • The most interesting moments from her mountaineering adventures; and
  • How to reach the summit of your greatest challenge. 

Before we begin, the right bit of inspiration can completely change the trajectory of someone’s life, so if there’s a friend or loved one who needs to hear this episode or could use some help to Win the Day, share it with them right now.

Let’s WIN THE DAY with Jenn Drummond!

James Whittaker:
Jenn, great to see you. Thanks so much for coming on the show!

Jenn Drummond:
Oh my goodness, I'm so grateful to be here! Thank you.

You've had an incredible journey. To kick things off, is there a story of struggle or success from when you were younger that helped contribute to the path you went down?

My grandma lived a mile away from us, and for me to be able to go to grandma's house, which meant I got gum to chew, the things that matter when you're five, I had to ride my bike without training wheels. My dad took off my training wheels and we had a gravel driveway that I learned how to ride my bike on, and after a couple spins, my dad's like, "We're going in, we'll try again tomorrow. This is enough." I'm like, "You can go in. I'm figuring this out." I stayed on that gravel driveway, scraped up, and figured out how to ride my bike without training wheels and got that gum.

I love that determination and persistence. What was life like for you in Park City leading up to the accident? 

When I first moved to Park City in 2015, it was super fun because I moved in January and then I wasn't able to be involved in anything. I wasn't room mum, I wasn't a soccer coach, I was nothing. My kids would go to school and I had all this time to do me. I just remember like, "Wow, this is amazing." You have seven children into a community, you have seven tentacles out there.

By the fall, I was back into who Jenn was. I was running classrooms, I was helping with sports, I was doing all things kids, and I liked it. I wouldn't say I loved it and I definitely didn't love it at the degree I was doing it, I was probably getting burned out. And I was just going through life.

Looking after your kids is admirable, but you have to keep an eye on it to make sure you don't lose yourself in the process.

I told myself that, when my kids launch, I'll get back to me, but right now it's the season of raising kids. This is my lot and I'm just going to accept it and make the most of it, while counting the days to do things without feeling guilty for doing them.

How long did that season last?

It was a novelty moving to Park City in 2015. I would definitely say three years until the accident happened.

You're in a season where I needed to be home for a while when my little kids were little and breastfeeding and all those different pieces. But then once I got to school, all of a sudden I had some time back and instead of taking that time for me, I took that time and dumped it into them more and the commitments outside the home with them. 

Looking after your kids is admirable, but you have to keep an eye on it to make sure you don't lose yourself in the process.

Exactly. If you lose your sense of self, you might grow up with some resentment, and there's a whole bunch of ways that can manifest.

It leaks out in weird ways. It's not always so obvious.

The accident was obviously a huge pivotal turning point in your life. Can you describe that situation?

That accident changed my life. I was driving home on the highway, paying attention to the side of the road, looking at the reservoir, taking it all in. My attention got brought back to the road. I realized I was coming up hot on a semi and I needed to get over to the other lane. I looked in my rearview mirror and saw that I could get over. I started moving over... 

Something was on the side of the road though and the semi was pulling a trailer, and he moved over a little bit too, and that back trailer swung out and I hit it. I went end over end three times, rolled sideways. I was upside down on the median, literally waiting to get hit again.

Hollywood has taught us the accident doesn't end, but I'm lucky – for me, a person came, pulled the windshield down. They're like, "Are you okay? Are you okay?" And I remember looking at them, the sound's coming back, "They're talking to me. Am I okay? I don't know if I'm okay. And looking at you, it's scary, so I don't know if I want to look at me based on your facial expression!"

I went end over end three times, rolled sideways. I was upside down on the median, literally waiting to get hit again.

I closed my eyes and I say this, I still do this to this day, I closed my eyes and I wiggled my fingers and toes and I remember thinking, "I can feel my fingers and toes. I can feel my fingers and toes. I'm okay." And I only say that because when it gets noisy or loud or I get anxiety before I'm doing something, I'll close my eyes and shut the world out.

I can feel my fingers and toes. I'm okay. Life's okay. And that was a big pivotal moment in my life. I went to the hospital, everything checked out. I came home and I walked in that front door and I saw my kids and it was the first time I was really like, "What happens if I didn't get to come home right now? What would my last encounters have been?" It's just fascinating to think about.

Did airbags and all that go off?

Everything. I mean everything. It was unbelievable.

When the police came, they're like, "We thought there's no way there's a human alive." And then when they saw the type of car it was, it actually has special airbags, they're like, "Maybe." 

A couple weeks after the accident, I got a phone call from the police station because they're trying to get a little bit more information because they said, "We've rebuilt this accident 50 different times. We cannot build one where you live, let alone walk away. And we're trying to figure out what we don't have right that is allowing you to be here?"

I don't get to choose when I die, but I sure get to choose how I live – and every day is a choice on how I'm going to live this life.

A couple of weeks after that, I have a girlfriend that I know that asked me to go running. I said, "I can't make it today. It's wet out anyways." She went for a run, slipped and hit her head on a rock, never came home. I survived this horrific accident. She does something that's healthy, and it was in that moment, I'm like, "You know what? I don't get to choose when I die, but I sure get to choose how I live – and every day is a choice on how I'm going to live this life."

I have so many questions! First, what type of car were you in?

Porsche Cayenne.

Shout out to Porsche for making good quality cars.

Porsche, I'm taking sponsorships!


You’re reading an excerpt of this interview. To access the full Win the Day episode with Jenn Drummond, including bonus content that doesn’t appear here, check out the YouTube or podcast version. 🚀


A great friend of mine, Dr. Mark Goulston, who's been on the show now twice, said, "Most people view the world as a danger to be avoided, whereas the truly great visionaries see it as an adventure to be lived." And you are one of those people who see it as an adventure to be lived.

Can you take us into how your mindset changed after that?

It's such an adventure. I survive a horrific crash that makes no sense. She does something that we're encouraged to do and doesn't get to come home. I'm like, "Okay, I have no control on this thing. I could be walking down the street and get hit, or I could be climbing a mountain and fall off, I guess, and die." 

I'm not going to play a game of how do I avoid death. I'm going to play, how do I make the most out of this life. And for 2019, I'm making bucket list after bucket list after bucket list of what do I want to see? Who do I want to become? What do I want to try? What do I want to taste? All the things, because no longer was I concerned about what you or anybody else thought of me. I was afraid that I wasn't going to be able to do all the things this planet had to offer because when you think about it, there's oceans to swim in and all kinds of stuff. 

I was like, "Hey, I could die tomorrow. Let's do this."

How did you adjust your daily routine and conversations with your kids after the accident?

The unique thing about the accident was it was going so fast that I was going slow. I dilated time in that moment to be able to be conscious, and I didn't leave my body. I think some people leave their body and watch it. I was in the accident and I remember coming home and a few weeks or whatever go by and I get a call from the principal's office because one of my kids is being a turd, and the principal calls me and he is like, "You actually sound a little happy that I called you." And I'm like, "I'm sorry. I don't mean to sound happy. I'm just so ecstatic that I'm here to take this call. There's such a possibility that I would never be here to be here for this call." And every moment is just such a gift.

I don’t focus on how to avoid death. I focus on how to make the most out of life.

It's not good. It's not bad. I get to experience it. And I remember watching my kids fight and before I'd be like, "Stop fighting with your sibling. Everybody get along." And now I'm looking at them, watching them fight. I'm in awe. This kid has this opinion, this one has that opinion. They care so much about the other person that they want them to believe the same thing that they believe and come together on this thing. 

Instead of telling them not, no one was getting hurt, no one was saying mean things, they were just getting loud about what they believed. I'm like, "How cool is that? That they're that passionate about what they believe, that they want others to follow them?" And there's so much beauty that I think I missed out on before because I was just so busy doing.

How do people choose how they live their life and empower themselves without having to go through a near death experience?

We learn how to slow down. We learn how to become present again. 

For me, I've set up a lot of trigger point meditations. For example, every single time I touch a doorknob in my house, that's a signal for me to take a deep breath in and just reconnect and get out of the pace that I'm in. We just get into these paces or these routines. Every time I'm at a red light, that's my gratitude light. That's a signal. What am I grateful for right now? This is a moment that the world's given me to pause and to connect back to who I am and how I want to show up. 

I'm very intentional about getting off of autopilot and interrupting myself so that I can check back in and be like, "Am I showing up how I want to show up? Am I being authentic? Am I making choices that are leading me in the direction I want to go? Or am I creating obstacles in my mind?"

I was an athlete and rest days were always my hardest. I am like, "Are you sure we shouldn't be doing anything today? I think we should be!" She's like, "No, rest days are active." She would put active rest day in there for me so that I took it as an action. And when we do that active pause, that intentional break, now we can respond instead of react. And there's so much power in responding.

You're FaceTiming from the top of K2, "Here I am on my active rest day!"

Totally.

How did mountaineering come on your radar?

It's so bizarre how we get led to the path that we take. I was turning 40 in 2020, and on my bucket list I had things like, "Okay, these are going to be good things to do in my forties, whereas museums and stuff can probably wait till my nineties. And what's this list that I want to start looking at? You know what? I'm going to climb a mountain for my 40th birthday to launch this decade and make it significant."

I'm going to climb a mountain for my 40th birthday to launch this decade and make it significant.

I asked friends of ours who were mountaineers. I live in Park City, in all fairness, I'm surrounded by mountains! And a couple of my friends said, "You should climb Ama Dablam." I'm like, "Okay, I don't know that mountain." They're like, "It's the Paramount Pictures logo. It means the mother's necklace. It's located in the Himalayas. It's this gorgeous mountain…” Dah, dah, dah, dah. And I'm like, "Okay, yeah, I'm going to climb Ama Dablam, sounds perfect." 

Then COVID hits. And now all of sudden, I'm a homeschool teacher to seven humans because school shut down and I'm not going anywhere.

If there's one thing that parents love, it's being trapped in a house with seven kids without being able to go outside for an extended period of time!

Exactly!

One of my kids was struggling with this math homework. I'm like, "Listen buddy, we do hard things." I'm giving them the proverbial pep talk. And he looks at me and he goes, "If we do hard things, why are you climbing Ama Dablam instead of a real mountain like Mount Everest?"

I'm like, "Do your homework. We'll look at Everest." He does his homework. We look at Everest, he goes to bed, and I sit there and I think, "You know what? Ama's harder than Everest. But if his perception is that Everest is the hardest mountain in the world, I'm going to climb it and I'm going to let him know that whatever your Everest is, you've got it."

Everest is the hardest mountain in the world, I'm going to climb it and I'm going to let him know that whatever your Everest is, you've got it.

I hired a coach. I'm training for Everest and Ama, my coach gives me a book about becoming an uphill athlete. I'd never slept in a tent before, there's lots for me to learn! And in the front of the book, someone got a Guinness World Record for doing something in the Alps, and I was feeling deflated as a mum at this moment when he calls me, I'm like, "Alan, I could have done that. I can suffer, and that is a suffer fest. And she got to a Guinness World Record. 

My kids learned how to read on Guinness World Records, and I'd be the coolest mum ever because there’s zero cool factor as a homeschooling mum." And Alan's like, "I'll think of something." I'm like, "Okay, fine. I'm not growing pumpkins. I'm not growing fingernails. I'm not speed-eating hot dogs, so whatever." And then he came back and he is like, "Jenn, I think I have the perfect record for you."

He goes, "I think you should be the first woman to climb the Seven Second Summits." I didn't even know what they were. I'm like, "Okay, what's that?" He said, "Okay, well listen. It's been done by one male, hasn't been done by a female. It's harder than the first seven, and it's seven continents, seven mountains. You have seven kids, so it sounds like a jackpot." I'm like, "It does sound like a jackpot. Let me look at it."

I looked at it with the kids and the kids were all excited about it. I was excited about it. I said, "Yes, I'm not a mountaineer, but whatever. If I don't do it, no one's done it before, whatever at least I'm trying." And my life very much left the place of having to win and went into having to experience. It gave me permission to step into that, and here we are.

What was the order?

I did Ojos del Salado in Chile first, Mount Kenya in Africa. I failed K2, went to Dykh-Tau in Russia, climbed that, Mount Tyree in Antarctica, failed Mount Logan, went back to summit K2, went to Australia to summit Mount Townsend, and then went back to Mount Logan and summited Mount Logan. 

It took me nine attempts to summit seven mountains.

When you say failed there, was it an expedition that didn't work out? Was it weather? 

Different things for each one. 

K2, the first time I had a teammate pass away in an avalanche, another one lost his hand to frostbite. Another one hurt their leg in the same avalanche. And I was on the mountain and I had the choice to go up with another team or come down and see what was going on with my team. 

When someone asked me if I wanted to go up, I'm like, "What do you mean? My teammates are injured, one died. I'm not going up this mountain. I'm going to be there for my team." And it's interesting, I came back to the US and I got home, a couple of days later, my kids got home from camp and they're like, "Hey, mum, did you summit? Did you summit?" I said, "No, but I had success." They're like, "What do you mean?"

How we show up as people is so much more important than what we'll ever achieve. 

I'm like, "How we show up as people is so much more important than what we'll ever achieve. And I gave up the mountain summit because I wanted to be there for my team, and you're going to be faced with these things in your life at some point too, just make sure you're putting people over peaks in whatever you pursue."

The beauty of that story is that I go back to climb K2 in 2022, and about three weeks before I leave for the climb, I get a phone call and they're like, "Hey, Jenn, are you coming back this season? Did you know there's a Pakistani female training to climb K2? She'd be the first one to climb our country's peak." I'm like, "That's amazing. We need to help." I bring over gear and some other resources, and I summit K2 and 30 minutes later, the first Pakistani female stood on top of her country's prize peak.

And I share that story because I think sometimes we have failures in our life and we think we're done. But I'm going to challenge you to question, are you still on the climb or does the universe have more for you in your pursuit? Sure, I failed the first time, but I think I was supposed to because otherwise I wouldn't have been able to be a part of the story that happened in 2022.

And who you become in climbing the mountain is much better and much more valuable than the view from the top.

I tell my kids all the time, we might try to convince ourselves that we climb the mountain for the mountaintop, but if that was truly the case, we take a helicopter and go from one summit to the next and take some photos and say, "Here it is." 

No, we climb so that when we stand on that summit, it's a summation of all the times we said yes, when we could have said no, all the times we picked ourselves back up, all the times we've said, "No, this is not going to define me. I'm going to define it." And we found that resilience and continued on. That's how we celebrate summits.

Describe making it to the summit of K2. Was it elation? Relief?

When you get to the top of a mountain, you take this deep breath in, "I made it." And when you take that breath in, everything disappears. There's no space, there's no time, there's no sun, there's no mountain. You're one with everything, and you're just in this moment of bliss and awe and just, "Wow, this is life." 

And then you breathe that out and you take a few more breaths in and out and you start connecting to you as a human. The mountain starts separating from you. You hear the wind again, you feel the sun again, and you say to yourself, "Okay, soul, I'm going to throw you back out there into this world. I can't wait till I find you again on whatever mountain that may be," because I feel like there's plenty of quotes out there. After a mountain is another mountain. There's always mountains for us to climb, and it's who we get to become and how we get to experience life in those climbs that really give it the significance.

What were the three most difficult mountains you climbed?

Mount Logan, Dykh-Tau and Mount Tyree. 

K2 has the reputation, it's because K2's climbed, people know K2, when you climb those other three, they're just next level mountaineering expeditions.

Can you describe those in more detail?

Mount Logan, for example, I still think if someone would've told me what was involved, I would've been like, "I'll stick with the beaches. We're going to do the seven nicest beaches in the world!"

When you get dropped off on Mount Logan, you get dropped off in a plane with all your things. There's no Sherpa, there's no routes. You're on this huge glacier. And you set up a tent and then you have to cut out ice blocks and build an ice wall because it's so windy that the wind will rip the tent and then you're dead. You have to protect your tent. Not only do you set it up, but then you protect it.

You have to cut out ice blocks and build an ice wall because it's so windy that the wind will rip the tent and then you're dead.

And then you have a sled and you're skiing up the mountain with all your gear. I'm 115 pounds. I'm carrying 80 pounds of gear. Some of it's in my back. Some of it's on the sled. You carry it and then you bury it so it doesn't blow away. Then you come back down to your tent, you melt water, you rehydrate food, and then you go to bed and the next day you pack all that up.

You ski past where you buried your stuff as far as you can go to set up another camp. You unload the tent, you build the ice walls, you do all that stuff. You go to bed, you ski back down to get your gear, you bring your gear back up. You inchworm up this mountain like this, and the entire time you're checking the weather, you're checking your fuel, you're checking how you're feeling, and you're on a ground that hasn't been tested. 

There could be a crevasse any minute. Every step you take is a poke to the left, a poke to the center, and a poke to the right with a stick. And if that gets rejected, you trust that it's strong enough for you to take a step forward. You do this for miles and days. 

We were in a storm one day and the snow was coming in, it was burying the tents. We had to bury the tent out because the wind wall would collect the snow. You'd have to dig yourself out. And then we were all in our gear because if the tent ripped, it was the only thing that was going to keep us warm. We'd lose everything. 

You're sitting there like, "Okay, if the tent rips, no one's coming to rescue us because the storm's this bad and we're going to have to survive for 14 hours till this thing settles." And then maybe someone can come find you. They're not finding you, it's not going to happen. 

Then when you climb Dykh-Tau or Tyree, there's no fixed ropes. When you climb Everest and K2, they'll fix ropes like onto rocks or different bolts or things. And then someone set the route and you're just following the route. When you're on those other two mountains, I'm roped off to you. And there's no route. We're making the route up as we go, or we're following what other people have done in the past that we have the notes on a little notepad to give us an idea of where we're going.


You’re reading an excerpt of this interview. To access the full Win the Day episode with Jenn Drummond, including bonus content that doesn’t appear here, check out the YouTube or podcast version. 🚀


Potential landmines everywhere.

Potential landmines everywhere. And then also if you slip, we're both falling until one of us stops us. If I slip, I'm pulling on you, you slip, you're pulling on me. And so much is we're trusting each other and we're here to protect each other. There's nothing else protecting us. It's just like your brain is so on point because not only am I responsible for me, I'm responsible for you.

That's a huge motivator from the Navy SEALs interviewed on this podcast. They say the fear of letting the other person down is a huge motivator in doing your best.

Huge. A hundred percent. 

I think in all of us, when we struggle, when I'm in a hard part on the mountain, I have to get out of my head. And I start sending thoughts to one of my kids, and then I get sick of that kid and I go to the next one and the next one and the next one. And it's so much we're a connected species. When it's hard, it's like, "Okay, now you got to focus on something bigger than yourself and it'll make it easier."

And it's obviously a lot easier to ski down a mountain than it is to walk down a mountain when you're in the snow. How often can you carry skis on these?

The only expedition we had skis for was Tyree because we had to build a base camp, and then we skied to the base of the mountain and then hiked up the mountain. 

When we were on Mount Logan, we skied most of that mountain. And then the last little stretch, we took the skis off and hiked. And you'd think it'd be fun skiing on the way down, you're like, "Hey, I went up this mountain. I get to ski on the way down."

Fresh powder! No one's ever been here.

We have free powder. But you can't ski where you haven't tested the ground. When we're going up, we're planting bamboo sticks the entire way so that we can see where we've been. And when you ski down, you have to follow those sticks. 

Because I was on Everest and we had the path that we followed. One of the Sherpa unclipped and walked four steps to the right to go to the bathroom, fell in the crevasse, and never came out.

That's sometimes the problem with people that are experienced. They forget how fragile we are and how big these mountains are.

You get too comfortable.

They're too comfortable, and they make a move like that. And having that experience, those bamboo sticks, I'm like, "I am on them. I know what four feet to the side can do." It's crazy.

Is it true you see all the dead bodies on the trail at Everest?

You do see a lot of them.

It's really interesting because Halloween's big in the US. You go to stores and you see mannequins and all that kind of stuff. When I was first on Everest, I'm like, "They're going to feel like humans." I feel like there's no life in them. They feel like a mannequin or they feel like someone dressed somebody up and they're selling that new article of clothing or something. And I know that sounds a little harsh, but that's the reality. Unless the color of the clothing caught your attention, nothing else is going to catch your attention on that.

Now that you've ticked all of these things off, is it like, "Job done. I'm sick of mountaineering. I'm going to move on to beaches"? Or are you more determined to climb more mountains?"

I did the mountain thing. I am a student of life and just curious about all the things. I have so many interests. I will definitely climb mountains, but there's a lot of things I want to see and do and experience that I don't want this whole life to be mountaineering.

And it's obviously a lot easier to ski down a mountain than it is to walk down a mountain when you're in the snow. How often can you carry skis on these?

The only expedition we had skis for was Tyree because we had to build a base camp, and then we skied to the base of the mountain and then hiked up the mountain. 

When we were on Mount Logan, we skied most of that mountain. And then the last little stretch, we took the skis off and hiked. And you'd think it'd be fun skiing on the way down, you're like, "Hey, I went up this mountain. I get to ski on the way down."

Fresh powder! No one's ever been here.

We have free powder. But you can't ski where you haven't tested the ground. When we're going up, we're planting bamboo sticks the entire way so that we can see where we've been. And when you ski down, you have to follow those sticks. 

Because I was on Everest and we had the path that we followed. One of the Sherpa unclipped and walked four steps to the right to go to the bathroom, fell in the crevasse, and never came out.

That's sometimes the problem with people that are experienced. They forget how fragile we are and how big these mountains are.

You get too comfortable.

They're too comfortable, and they make a move like that. And having that experience, those bamboo sticks, I'm like, "I am on them. I know what four feet to the side can do." It's crazy.

Is it true you see all the dead bodies on the trail at Everest?

You do see a lot of them.

It's really interesting because Halloween's big in the US. You go to stores and you see mannequins and all that kind of stuff. When I was first on Everest, I'm like, "They're going to feel like humans." I feel like there's no life in them. They feel like a mannequin or they feel like someone dressed somebody up and they're selling that new article of clothing or something. And I know that sounds a little harsh, but that's the reality. Unless the color of the clothing caught your attention, nothing else is going to catch your attention on that.

Now that you've ticked all of these things off, is it like, "Job done. I'm sick of mountaineering. I'm going to move on to beaches"? Or are you more determined to climb more mountains?"

I did the mountain thing. I am a student of life and just curious about all the things. I have so many interests. I will definitely climb mountains, but there's a lot of things I want to see and do and experience that I don't want this whole life to be mountaineering.

Big mountains take big teams.

Whenever I'm getting overwhelmed on something, I'm like, "Do I have enough people on this team to make this happen?" Instead of what do I need to do more of? It's like, "I'm getting worn out. Who else do I need to have help me?" I think that's a big framework to help people with things. And just carry the torch longer. 

Another key aspect is waving your flag. We love to wave our flag on the summit of a mountain, like, "Here I am, I made it, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." But learning how to wave your flag along the whole journey is signaling to the world, "Here's what I'm trying to do, here's what I need and here's how I can help." 

If we look at my K2 example that we talked about earlier, I didn't summit. I was coming back. People knew that I had my flag out, and look how I was able to help that girl, look how she was able to make my journey more meaningful. And when we have the courage to wave our flag anywhere we are, it just is going to help us achieve what we desire to achieve in ways bigger than what we could have come up with ourselves.

What's an affirmation that you would write on a flashcard that you could show yourself on your worst day?

I am worthy.

Final question – what's one thing you do to Win the Day?

I have a positive toothbrush talk. When I brush my teeth in the morning, I only allow myself to say positive things to myself during that time.

Jenn, thanks so much for coming on the show.

Thank you. I appreciate it.


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That’s all for this episode! Get out there and win the day.

Until next time…

Onward and upward always,

James Whittaker

PS - If you have a question and want it featured on the Win the Day podcast, email your question (in writing or as an audio message) to: info@jameswhitt.com


Resources / links mentioned:

🎯 Take the ⁠⁠⁠Win the Day Quiz⁠⁠⁠ and get your FREE personalized action plan

⚡ Jenn Drummond website

📝 Jenn Drummond Facebook

📷 Jenn Drummond Instagram

🌎 Jenn Drummond LinkedIn

📚 ‘Breakproof: 7 Strategies to Build Resilience and Achieve Your Life Goals’ by Jenn Drummond

🎬 Subscribe to Win the Day YouTube channel

💚 Give the Win the Day podcast a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts

🙏 Give the Win the Day podcast a 5-star rating on Spotify

💕 Win the Day Facebook group

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